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Korea Constructs Road That Wirelessly Charges Moving Electric Buses.

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People often think of switching to battery operated vehicles, but it becomes a nightmare for the drivers to look at the low battery sign on the dashboard with no means to recharge it again.

Maybe there is a way to release this fear. What if battery-operated electric cars work far better and don’t have to lug around huge and expensive batteries?

The researchers at Korea’s Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have developed a technology to solve both the conundrums. They have created first-of-its-kind on-line electric vehicle (OLEV) system, that can recharge electric cars or buses while they are on the go.

In the city of Gumi, South Korea, a seven-and-a-half-mile stretch of asphalt roadway has been constructed with power sources periodically embedded in the road. As a bus approaches and leaves, these power sources connect to the grid and are turned on and off selectively. According to KAIST, only 5% to 15% of the already existing road needs to be rebuild to make it a wireless charger.

The batteries used in the buses are almost third the size of a normal electric car battery, yet the buses don’t need to stop for charging and are more cost effective. This technology being eco-friendly can curb the increasing carbon level, hence solving many pollutions related health issues.

posted Jan 5, 2016 by Abhishek Maheshwari

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Robot Buses Are Coming To America, To Pave The Way For Driverless Cars

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fljDBL76yDY

First, a quiet business park. Next, the world.

Self-driving buses are coming to America. The Bishop Ranch business park in San Ramon, California will be the first place in the U.S. to use French robo-buses to ferry passengers around.

Perhaps the best place for autonomous vehicles to start out is in this kind of training ground, although given the safety record of Google’s self-driving cars, the training might be for us humans in getting used to them. It’s hard to argue that preset routes and low speeds aren’t ideal for an introduction to driverless vehicles, and that’s just what the Easymile company specializes in.

The EZ10 is a driverless bus designed for short hops. It has been deployed in Europe—in Finland, France, and is just about to launch in Spain. The electric vehicles carry up to ten passengers, and have ramps for wheelchairs and strollers. The idea is that they carry you the "last mile" of your journey, and one of their main uses is in theme parks.

To find its way around, the EZ10 uses GPS to follow a pre-programmed route, along with laser sensors to avoid obstacles. This is a much easier job than that of Google’s autonomous cars, which need to be on the lookout for vehicles, pedestrians, and all kinds of surprise hazards as they hurtle along at highway speeds.

Randell Iwasaki, executive director of CCTA, a company that operates the GoMentum Station testing ground for driverless vehicles, says this tech will help travelers get to transit stations, business districts and other local amenities "without the hassle of driving and parking."

This kind of short-range, semi-smart vehicle might be the ideal wedge to drive into our driver-centric transport system. Who knows? One day we may look at human-piloted vehicles the same way that U.S. drivers look at cars with manual transmission—something for enthusiasts.

http://bit.ly/Robot-Buses-America-vs-Driverless-Cars

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e67j51iC_8c

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