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10 common mistakes that you make in your resume

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A resume is a paper document which a person use to sell themselves to companies in a better way. So, can you tolerate any mistake in those document? Of course not.

Let's take a look at 10 common mistakes that you make in your resume:

1. Avoid grammatical errors, abbreviation and misspelling of words in your resume.

2. No one would love to read a 10-page resume. Make it compact and effective.

3. Never forget to mention the keywords for the job you have applied.

4. Lack of clarity of skills and achievements. Put on the relevant skills for the post of a particular job.

5. Inappropriate email ID can down a job offer for you. So, you better use your name or birthdate.

6. The irrelevant objective can prove to be resume killer.

7. You should know the word limit for a resume.

8. Never use present tense for the past job.

9. Skip out the personal pronouns. Because everybody knows the resume is all about you.

10. Never ever, try to list those things that you even don’t know. Recruiters are smart and they can judge anyone within seconds.

posted Jun 10 by Santosh Nandi

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Some things about life—and how long we get to enjoy it—are out of our control. But emerging nutrition science research, as well as data collected from people in their 90s and beyond, shows what, when, and how we eat has a profound influence on how long we live. Want to eat for a long and healthy life?

Let's take a look at 10 food secrets that make you live longer:

1. All the green, leafy things

Produce, whole grains and beans dominate meals all year long in each of the Blue Zones. People eat an impressive variety of vegetables when they are in season, and then pickle or dry the surplus. The best of the best longevity foods are leafy greens. In Ikaria, more than 75 varieties grow like weeds. Studies found that middle-aged people who consumed the equivalent of a cup of cooked greens daily were half as likely to die in the next four years as those who ate no greens.

2. Consume meat no more than twice a week

Families in a large portion of the Blue Zones appreciate meat sparingly, as a side or an approach to season different dishes. Mean to constrain your admission to 2 ounces or less of cooked meat (a sum littler than a deck of cards) five times each month. Furthermore, support chicken, sheep or pork from family ranches. The meat in the Blue Zones originates from creatures that touch or scrounge uninhibitedly, which likely prompts more elevated amounts of omega-3 unsaturated fats.

3. Eat up to 3 ounces of fish daily

The Adventist Health Study 2, which has been following 96,000 Americans since 2002, found that individuals who ate a plant-based eating routine and incorporated a little part of fish up to once a day were the ones who experienced the longest. In the Blue Zones abroad, angle is a typical piece of regular suppers. Generally, the best fish decisions are center of-the-natural pecking order species, for example, sardines, anchovies and cod, which aren't presented to elevated amounts of mercury or different chemicals.

4. Cut back on dairy

The human digestive system isn't optimized for cow's milk, which happens to be high in fat and sugar. People in the Blue Zones get their calcium from plants. (A cup of cooked kale, for instance, gives you as much calcium as a cup of milk.) However, goat's- and sheep's-milk products like yogurt and cheese are common in the traditional diets of Ikaria and Sardinia. We don't know if it's the milk that makes folks healthier or the fact that they climb the same hilly terrain as their goats.

5. Enjoy up to three eggs per week

In the Blue Zones, individuals have a tendency to eat only one egg at any given moment: For instance, Nicoyans broil an egg to crease into a corn tortilla and Okinawans heat up an egg in soup. Give filling a shot a one-egg breakfast with natural product or other plant-based nourishments, for example, entire grain porridge or bread. When heating, utilize 1/4 measure of fruit purée, 1/4 measure of pureed potatoes or a little banana to sub in for one egg.

6. Add a half cup of cooked beans every day

Black beans in Nicoya, soybeans in Okinawa, lentils, garbanzo and white beans in the Mediterranean: Beans are the cornerstone of Blue Zones diets. On average, beans are made up of 21 percent protein, 77 percent complex carbohydrates and only a little fat. They're also an excellent source of fiber and are packed with more nutrients per gram than any other food on earth. The Blue Zones dietary average—at least 1/2 cup per day—provides most of the vitamins and minerals that you need.

7. Go nuts

A handful of nuts a day can add many days to your life, according to a study done by the Harvard Medical School. People who noshed on almonds, walnuts, pistachios, and other tasty treats were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause. While the reason why isn't clear yet, the researchers think it has to do how nuts help us feel fuller faster and help control blood sugar spikes. Plus, nuts are a great source of vital minerals like magnesium, as well as protein and fiber, which have also been linked to a longer life.

8. Be berry good

Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, and different berries are as solid as they are delicious. A 2013 Spanish examination found that individuals who ate the delightful organic product a few times each week had a 30 percent bring down danger of biting the dust. Analysts think the lift in life span is on account of berries' high grouping of polyphenols, a micronutrient appeared to avoid degenerative maladies.

9. Up your water intake

Adventists recommend having seven glasses daily, pointing to studies that show that being hydrated lessens the chance of a blood clot. Plus, if you're drinking water, you're not drinking a sugar-laden or artificially sweetened beverage.

10. Drink green tea

Okinawans nurse green tea all day long, and green tea has been shown to lower the risk of heart disease and several cancers. Ikarians drink brews of rosemary, wild sage and dandelion—all herbs with anti-inflammatory properties.

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The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, located against the back muscles in the upper abdominal cavity just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. The kidneys detoxify the blood and aid the body in filtering out waste products through urine.

Another primary function of the kidneys is to remove excess water from the body. They also help retain water when the body needs more.

Moreover, the kidneys help regulate the levels of minerals like calcium and phosphate in the body. They also produce important hormones that help regulate body functions like blood pressure and making of red blood cells to carry oxygen and important nutrients throughout the body.

To stay healthy, it is essential to keep the kidneys functioning properly. Some common symptoms that can indicate kidney problems are a change in color and quantity of your urine, dizziness, vomiting, anemia, breathing issues, feeling cold most of the time, tiredness or fatigue, itchy skin, bad breath and sudden pain in the body. If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your doctor to rule out the possibility of kidney disease.

There are many reasons behind kidney problems. However, many habits that people adopt can also cause huge damage to their kidneys.

1. Overusing Painkillers
Over the counter pain medicines, such as NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)
, may alleviate your aches and pains, but they can harm the kidneys, especially if you already have kidney disease. Reduce your regular use of NSAIDs and never go over the recommended dosage.

2. Abusing the Salt Shaker
Diets high in salt are high in sodium, which can increase blood pressure and, in turn, harm your kidneys.  Flavor your foods with herbs and spices instead of salt.  Over time, you may find it easier to avoid using added salt (sodium) on your food.

3. Eating Processed Foods
Processed foods are significant sources of sodium and phosphorus. Many people who have kidney disease need to limit phosphorus in their diets. Some studies have shown that high phosphorus intake from processed foods in people without kidney disease may be harmful to their kidneys and bones.  Try adopting the DASH diet to guide your healthy eating habits.

4. Not Drinking Enough Water
Staying well hydrated helps your kidneys clear sodium and toxins from the body. Drinking plenty of water is also one of the best ways to avoid painful kidney stones. Those with kidney problems or kidney failure may need to restrict their fluid intake, but for most people, drinking 1.5 to 2 liters (3 to 4 pints) of water per day is a healthy target.

5. Missing Out on Sleep
A good night’s rest is extremely important to your overall well-being and, it turns out, your kidneys. Kidney function is regulated by the sleep-wake cycle which helps coordinate the kidneys’ workload over 24 hours.  Research shows that people who sleep less usually have faster kidney function decline.

6. Eating Too Much Meat
Animal protein generates high amounts of acid in the blood that can be harmful to the kidneys and cause acidosis – a condition in which kidneys cannot eliminate acid fast enough.  Protein is needed for growth, upkeep and repair of all parts of the body but your diet should be well balanced with fruits and vegetables.

7. Eating Too Many Foods High in Sugar
Sugar contributes to obesity which increases your risk of developing high blood pressure and diabetes, two of the leading causes of kidney disease. In addition to desserts, sugar is often added to foods and drinks that you may not consider “sweet.” Avoid condiments, breakfast cereals, and white bread which are all sneaky sources of processed sugar. Pay attention to the ingredients when buying packaged goods to avoid added sugar in your diet.

8. Lighting Up
Sure, smoking isn't good for your lungs or your heart. But did you know that smoking may not be good for your kidneys either? People who smoke are more likely to have protein in the urine – a sign of kidney damage.

9. Drinking Alcohol in Excess 
Regular heavy drinking – more than four drinks a day – has been found to double the risk chronic kidney disease. Heavy drinkers who also smoke have an even higher risk of kidney problems. Smokers who are heavy drinkers have about five times the chance of developing chronic kidney disease than people who don’t smoke or drink alcohol to excess.

10. Sitting Still 
Sitting for long periods of time has now been linked to the development of kidney disease. Although researchers don’t know yet why or how sedentary time or physical activity directly impact kidney health, it is known that greater physical activity is associated with  improved blood pressure and glucose metabolism, both important factors in kidney health.

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