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10 common mistakes that you make in your resume

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A resume is a paper document which a person use to sell themselves to companies in a better way. So, can you tolerate any mistake in those document? Of course not.

Let's take a look at 10 common mistakes that you make in your resume:

1. Avoid grammatical errors, abbreviation and misspelling of words in your resume.

2. No one would love to read a 10-page resume. Make it compact and effective.

3. Never forget to mention the keywords for the job you have applied.

4. Lack of clarity of skills and achievements. Put on the relevant skills for the post of a particular job.

5. Inappropriate email ID can down a job offer for you. So, you better use your name or birthdate.

6. The irrelevant objective can prove to be resume killer.

7. You should know the word limit for a resume.

8. Never use present tense for the past job.

9. Skip out the personal pronouns. Because everybody knows the resume is all about you.

10. Never ever, try to list those things that you even don’t know. Recruiters are smart and they can judge anyone within seconds.

posted Jun 10 by Santosh Nandi

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Some things about life—and how long we get to enjoy it—are out of our control. But emerging nutrition science research, as well as data collected from people in their 90s and beyond, shows what, when, and how we eat has a profound influence on how long we live. Want to eat for a long and healthy life?

Let's take a look at 10 food secrets that make you live longer:

1. All the green, leafy things

Produce, whole grains and beans dominate meals all year long in each of the Blue Zones. People eat an impressive variety of vegetables when they are in season, and then pickle or dry the surplus. The best of the best longevity foods are leafy greens. In Ikaria, more than 75 varieties grow like weeds. Studies found that middle-aged people who consumed the equivalent of a cup of cooked greens daily were half as likely to die in the next four years as those who ate no greens.

2. Consume meat no more than twice a week

Families in a large portion of the Blue Zones appreciate meat sparingly, as a side or an approach to season different dishes. Mean to constrain your admission to 2 ounces or less of cooked meat (a sum littler than a deck of cards) five times each month. Furthermore, support chicken, sheep or pork from family ranches. The meat in the Blue Zones originates from creatures that touch or scrounge uninhibitedly, which likely prompts more elevated amounts of omega-3 unsaturated fats.

3. Eat up to 3 ounces of fish daily

The Adventist Health Study 2, which has been following 96,000 Americans since 2002, found that individuals who ate a plant-based eating routine and incorporated a little part of fish up to once a day were the ones who experienced the longest. In the Blue Zones abroad, angle is a typical piece of regular suppers. Generally, the best fish decisions are center of-the-natural pecking order species, for example, sardines, anchovies and cod, which aren't presented to elevated amounts of mercury or different chemicals.

4. Cut back on dairy

The human digestive system isn't optimized for cow's milk, which happens to be high in fat and sugar. People in the Blue Zones get their calcium from plants. (A cup of cooked kale, for instance, gives you as much calcium as a cup of milk.) However, goat's- and sheep's-milk products like yogurt and cheese are common in the traditional diets of Ikaria and Sardinia. We don't know if it's the milk that makes folks healthier or the fact that they climb the same hilly terrain as their goats.

5. Enjoy up to three eggs per week

In the Blue Zones, individuals have a tendency to eat only one egg at any given moment: For instance, Nicoyans broil an egg to crease into a corn tortilla and Okinawans heat up an egg in soup. Give filling a shot a one-egg breakfast with natural product or other plant-based nourishments, for example, entire grain porridge or bread. When heating, utilize 1/4 measure of fruit purée, 1/4 measure of pureed potatoes or a little banana to sub in for one egg.

6. Add a half cup of cooked beans every day

Black beans in Nicoya, soybeans in Okinawa, lentils, garbanzo and white beans in the Mediterranean: Beans are the cornerstone of Blue Zones diets. On average, beans are made up of 21 percent protein, 77 percent complex carbohydrates and only a little fat. They're also an excellent source of fiber and are packed with more nutrients per gram than any other food on earth. The Blue Zones dietary average—at least 1/2 cup per day—provides most of the vitamins and minerals that you need.

7. Go nuts

A handful of nuts a day can add many days to your life, according to a study done by the Harvard Medical School. People who noshed on almonds, walnuts, pistachios, and other tasty treats were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause. While the reason why isn't clear yet, the researchers think it has to do how nuts help us feel fuller faster and help control blood sugar spikes. Plus, nuts are a great source of vital minerals like magnesium, as well as protein and fiber, which have also been linked to a longer life.

8. Be berry good

Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, and different berries are as solid as they are delicious. A 2013 Spanish examination found that individuals who ate the delightful organic product a few times each week had a 30 percent bring down danger of biting the dust. Analysts think the lift in life span is on account of berries' high grouping of polyphenols, a micronutrient appeared to avoid degenerative maladies.

9. Up your water intake

Adventists recommend having seven glasses daily, pointing to studies that show that being hydrated lessens the chance of a blood clot. Plus, if you're drinking water, you're not drinking a sugar-laden or artificially sweetened beverage.

10. Drink green tea

Okinawans nurse green tea all day long, and green tea has been shown to lower the risk of heart disease and several cancers. Ikarians drink brews of rosemary, wild sage and dandelion—all herbs with anti-inflammatory properties.

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The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, located against the back muscles in the upper abdominal cavity just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. The kidneys detoxify the blood and aid the body in filtering out waste products through urine.

Another primary function of the kidneys is to remove excess water from the body. They also help retain water when the body needs more.

Moreover, the kidneys help regulate the levels of minerals like calcium and phosphate in the body. They also produce important hormones that help regulate body functions like blood pressure and making of red blood cells to carry oxygen and important nutrients throughout the body.

To stay healthy, it is essential to keep the kidneys functioning properly. Some common symptoms that can indicate kidney problems are a change in color and quantity of your urine, dizziness, vomiting, anemia, breathing issues, feeling cold most of the time, tiredness or fatigue, itchy skin, bad breath and sudden pain in the body. If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your doctor to rule out the possibility of kidney disease.

There are many reasons behind kidney problems. However, many habits that people adopt can also cause huge damage to their kidneys.

1. Overusing Painkillers
Over the counter pain medicines, such as NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)
, may alleviate your aches and pains, but they can harm the kidneys, especially if you already have kidney disease. Reduce your regular use of NSAIDs and never go over the recommended dosage.

2. Abusing the Salt Shaker
Diets high in salt are high in sodium, which can increase blood pressure and, in turn, harm your kidneys.  Flavor your foods with herbs and spices instead of salt.  Over time, you may find it easier to avoid using added salt (sodium) on your food.

3. Eating Processed Foods
Processed foods are significant sources of sodium and phosphorus. Many people who have kidney disease need to limit phosphorus in their diets. Some studies have shown that high phosphorus intake from processed foods in people without kidney disease may be harmful to their kidneys and bones.  Try adopting the DASH diet to guide your healthy eating habits.

4. Not Drinking Enough Water
Staying well hydrated helps your kidneys clear sodium and toxins from the body. Drinking plenty of water is also one of the best ways to avoid painful kidney stones. Those with kidney problems or kidney failure may need to restrict their fluid intake, but for most people, drinking 1.5 to 2 liters (3 to 4 pints) of water per day is a healthy target.

5. Missing Out on Sleep
A good night’s rest is extremely important to your overall well-being and, it turns out, your kidneys. Kidney function is regulated by the sleep-wake cycle which helps coordinate the kidneys’ workload over 24 hours.  Research shows that people who sleep less usually have faster kidney function decline.

6. Eating Too Much Meat
Animal protein generates high amounts of acid in the blood that can be harmful to the kidneys and cause acidosis – a condition in which kidneys cannot eliminate acid fast enough.  Protein is needed for growth, upkeep and repair of all parts of the body but your diet should be well balanced with fruits and vegetables.

7. Eating Too Many Foods High in Sugar
Sugar contributes to obesity which increases your risk of developing high blood pressure and diabetes, two of the leading causes of kidney disease. In addition to desserts, sugar is often added to foods and drinks that you may not consider “sweet.” Avoid condiments, breakfast cereals, and white bread which are all sneaky sources of processed sugar. Pay attention to the ingredients when buying packaged goods to avoid added sugar in your diet.

8. Lighting Up
Sure, smoking isn't good for your lungs or your heart. But did you know that smoking may not be good for your kidneys either? People who smoke are more likely to have protein in the urine – a sign of kidney damage.

9. Drinking Alcohol in Excess 
Regular heavy drinking – more than four drinks a day – has been found to double the risk chronic kidney disease. Heavy drinkers who also smoke have an even higher risk of kidney problems. Smokers who are heavy drinkers have about five times the chance of developing chronic kidney disease than people who don’t smoke or drink alcohol to excess.

10. Sitting Still 
Sitting for long periods of time has now been linked to the development of kidney disease. Although researchers don’t know yet why or how sedentary time or physical activity directly impact kidney health, it is known that greater physical activity is associated with  improved blood pressure and glucose metabolism, both important factors in kidney health.

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India is an incredible land with a rich and diverse wildlife. Did you know that 4% of India’s land is under forests? There are about 515 wildlife sanctuaries in India which are home to 1180 different species of birds, 350 species of mammals, 30000 different kinds of insects and more than 15000 varieties of plants. Phew! You will be simply mesmerized by the natural beauty at wildlife sanctuaries. 

Let's take a look at top 10 National Parks in India that you must visit once:

1. Kaziranga National Park, Assam

The amazing world of the north-east! It boasts of being a world natural heritage site as declared by UNESCO. Spread over 858 sq. Km around the Brahmaputra River, this magical sanctuary, is most famous for the endangered One-horned Rhino. 2/3rd of the world’s population of these Rhinos lives in this forest. This is also the abode of 60% of the India’s wild buffalo population. Characterised by vast stretches of savannah grasslands, wetlands and chars of river islands formed by the shifting course of the river, you can find a sizeable population of birds here. Though you have a jeep safari which takes you around, we recommend that you explore this wonder via an elephant safari. It would be a priceless memory to view the rhinos grazing with the buffaloes and deer while you enjoy the ride treading through the tall grass.

2. Sunderbans National Park, West Bengal

The Sunderbans Tiger Reserve is the showpiece attraction of coastal West Bengal. Although an encounter with the famed Royal Bengal tiger is not guaranteed, a boat cruise on the muddy rivulets meandering through dense mangrove forests is sure to thrill you to no end. Home to one of the largest concentrations of royal Bengal tigers on the planet, the Sunderbans Tiger Reserve is a network of water channels and semi-submerged mangrove forests that collectively form the world’s largest river delta. Tigers (officially estimated to number close to 300) lurk in the impenetrable depths of the mangrove forests, and also swim the delta’s rivulets. Although they sometimes kill villagers and their cattle, tigers here are typically very shy and sightings are thus rare. Nevertheless, cruising the waterways through the world’s biggest mangrove  sanctuary (now a Unesco World Heritage Site) and watching wildlife – whether it be a spotted deer, a 2m-long water monitor of a luminescent kingfisher – is a world away from your usual urban chaos.

3. Bandhavgarh National Park, Madhya Pradesh

The famous white tigers of Rewa were discovered in this forest and Bandhavgarh is considered to be the home of these tigers. However, no white tigers have been spotted since 50 years here. This forest is spread over 105 sq. kms on the Vindhya Hills in Madhya Pradesh. It boasts of having highest density of the royal Bengal tiger population in the country. Apart from the tigers you can get spectacular views of other majestic creatures like Nilgai, Chital, Chinkara, Wild Boar, Chausingha and more. With 250 species of birds and 22 different species of mammals, this national park has a lot to offer for nature lovers.

4. Jim Corbett National Park, Uttarakhand

Striped tigers majestically roam an expansive savannah, moody elephants double as unexpected roadblocks, gharial crocs bask on the banks of limpid green rivulets, and hundreds of eyes spy on you from the primal depths of an evergreen forest. Established in 1936 as India’s first national park, Corbett takes its name from the legendary tiger hunter Jim Corbett (1875–1955), who put Kumaon (the district in which the forest lies) on the map with his celebrated book The Maneaters of Kumaon. Covering an area of more than 1300 sq km, this terai wildland is home to nearly 200 tigers, about 300 wild elephants, sloth bears, langur monkeys, rhesus macaques, peacocks, otters, gharials and several species of deer among other animals. The varied landscape of the park – ranging from dense vegetation to rolling grasslands – is an added draw.

5. Ranthambore National Park, Rajasthan

Comprising 1334 sq km of wild jungle scrub hemmed in by rocky ridges, this famous park, open from October to June, is the best place to spot wild tigers in Rajasthan. At its centre is the amazing 10th-century Ranthambhore Fort, scattered around which are a number of ancient temples and mosques, hunting pavilions, crocodile-filled lakes and vine covered chhatris. The most famous resident of the park is of course the tiger. However, getting an accurate figure on the number of tigers comes down to who you believe – the park probably has around 32 tigers. Spotting one is a matter of luck; you should plan on two or three safaris to improve your chances. The only way to travel into the core of the national park is by going on the safari. These safaris are usually done in open-top canters and Gypsys. But remember there’s plenty of other wildlife to see including more than 300 species of birds.

6. Kanha National Park, Madhya Pradesh

Kanha National Park is one of the most sought after National Parks in India. Centrally located in the state of Madhya Pradesh, Kanha is famous as a Tiger Reserve among the wildlife enthusiasts. Kanha is divided into two wildlife sanctuaries namely Hallon and Banjar, of 250 and 300 sq. km respectively. The park is densely populated with Bengal tiger, Barasingha, Indian leopards, the sloth bear, and Indian wild dog. It also houses swamp deer, which is a subspecies of the Great Swamp Deer of Sundarbans and is found nowhere else except Sundarbans. Kanha also nestles more 1000 species of exotic flowers that are one of its kind. This wildlife sojourn is one of the most favourite among the tourists who flock this park to get a glimpse of the wildlife in its real allure.

7. Bandipur National Park, Karnataka

Bandipur National Park, is located in Karnataka, which is easily accessible from Mysore, Bangalore and Ooty. Once upon a time, this wildlife sanctuary was used as the private ground for hunting by the Maharajas of Mysore. Spread across 874 sq. km, Bandipur National Park is surrounded with Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary in Tamil Nadu, Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary in Kerala and Nagarhole National Park. This park houses elephants, spotted deer, gaurs (bison), antelopes and numerous other native species. The lush greenery is particularly mesmerizing after the onset of the monsoon, however, October to May remain the best time to visit. Explore this wildlife sanctuary in an early morning jeep safari, and you will be treated with some magnificent sights to remember.

8. Mudumalai National Park, Tamil Nadu

In the foothills of the Nilgiri Mountains in Tamil Nadu, this 321sq km forest reserve is like a classical South Indian landscape painting brought to life – thin, spindly trees and light-slotted leaves concealing spotted chital deer and grunting wild boar. The showcase species in Mudumalai is the striped royal Bengal tiger. There are around 50 tigers lurking in these jungles – giving Mudumalai the highest tiger density anywhere in the country. However, as in any other nature reserve, you will have to be extremely lucky to actually spot one. Overall, though, the reserve is the best place to spot wildlife in Tamil Nadu. The creatures you are most likely to see are deer, peacocks, wild boar, langurs and giant Malabar squirrels. There’s also a significant chance of sighting wild elephants (the park has several hundred) and gaur or the Indian bison.

9. Dudhwa National Park, Uttar Pradesh

Easily spotted is the one horned rhinoceros, reintroduced into Dudhwa National Park following its complete disappearance from these areas. This is also where hordes of handsome barasinghas (swamp deer), the state animal, play hide-and-seek amidst magnificent swathes of grassland. The 680sq km Dudhwa National Park is located 75km north of Lakhimpur. The park itself is barely 10km from its closest township Palia Kalan – also the stretch along which the very limited accommodation options are located – and about 25km to Gaurifanta on the Indo-Nepal border. The best way to access its wildlife is through twice-daily safaris offered by the Forest Department. The elephant safari, conducted only early mornings, lasts up to an hour and is limited to the rhinoceros enclosure at Salukhapur. The jeep safari, which takes up to three hours, can be enjoyed both early morning and late afternoon. A Gypsy is everyone’s vehicle of choice to negotiate the terrain inside the park and can be hired locally. You’ll do well to book ahead as there are a limited number available.

10. Periyar National Park, Kerala

Located near Thekaddy in Kerela, Periyar National Park is famous for its endangered flora and fauna. Nestled amidst two rivers Periyar and Pamba, this wildlife sanctuary habitats both tigers and elephants in plenty. Spread over an area of 925 sq. km, this park was declared as Periyar National Park in the year 1982. What makes this wildlife one of its kind is its location. While you have two rivers gushing in, it is also surrounded by the Cardamom Hills and Pandalam Hills of Western Ghats bordering Tamil Nadu. Along with 24 Royal Bengal tigers, Periyar also have few white tigers in the park that will leave you with some spellbinding experience. Periyar also houses variety of species of bird, some of which are rare and migratory.

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